An Experimental Takeover

TYPE: MUSIC

SPACE: PERFORMANCE SPACE

WHEN: 7-11.45pm – 14 Jul 2018

COST: $10 on door

Until the 18th century, most plays were divided into five acts. The five acts play specific functions in the overall structure of the performance; but there is not necessarily any clear separation between them.

Femme Flagging / Act 1 -- Exposition. Attention is directed toward the germ of conflict and dramatic tensions.
Femme Flagging is a Sydney based solo electronic artist and singer, crafting an electronic hanky code for queer lonely hearts with analogue synthesisers, both vintage and modern.

Justice Yeldham / Act 2 -- Complications. Interests clash, tension mounts, and momentum builds.
Justice Yeldham ecstatically purses his lips against panes of amplified glass whilst deftly employing various vocal techniques ranging from throat singing to raspberries, turning discarded shards into crude musical instruments. The results are a wild array of cacophonous noise that is oddly controlled and strangely musical.

NO-FI / Act 3 -- Rising Action. The development of conflict reaches its turning point.
Pulling together delayed and distorted percussion, rumbling bass drones and cassette manipulation, NO-FI moves between haunting ambience, floor filling industrial beats and ear splitting noise at the flick of a switch.

Gravel Pit / Act 4 -- Falling Action. Reversals. Momentum slows, and tension is heightened.
Gravel Pit are a Sydney based experimental and electronic music trio that combine manipulated live instrumentation with layered samples, synths and glitched vocals.

Flower Boy 卓颖贤 / Act 5 — Dénouement. Resolve. A sense of catharsis, a release of tension and anxiety. The final outcome is reached.
At the heart of Flower Boy 卓颖贤’s hazy, ambient songwriting is a duality of melancholic love songs and odes to identity and heritage.

$10 - Doors at 7pm - Performances begin at 8pm (sharp)

We would like to acknowledge that this performance is being held on Aboriginal land, the land of the the Gadigal people of the Eora nation. Sovereignty was never ceded.